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    Learn English > English lessons and exercises > English test #4876: In case or if
    > Other English exercises on the same topic: [Change theme]
    > Similar tests: - Comparatives / Superlatives - Comparative of superiority - Passive form - Superlative + and adjective - Comparatives of superiority - Adjectives and adverbs - Adverbs of frequency - Dialogue : What time...?
    > Double-click on words you don't understand


    In case or if


    In case or if

     

    Ann might phone tonight. I don't want to go out in case she phones. (= because it is possible she will phone)

    I'll draw a map for you in case you can't find our house. (= because it is possible you won't be able to find it)

    We use just in case for a smaller possibility:

    I don't think it will rain but I'll take an umbrella just in case. (= just in case it rains)

    Do not use will after in case. Use a present tense for the future

    I don't want to go out tonight in case Ann phones, (not 'in case Ann will phone')

     

    - In case is not the same as if. We use in case to say why somebody does (or doesn't do) something. You do something now in case something happens later.

     

    Compare:

    In case:

     

    • We'll buy some more food in case Tom comes.(= Perhaps Tom will come; we'll buy some more food now, whether he comes or not; then we'll already have the food //he comes.)
    • I'll give you my phone number in case you need to contact me.
    • You should insure your bicycle in case it is stolen.

    If:

     

    ·        We'll buy some more food if Tom comes. (= Perhaps Tom will come; if he comes, we'll buy some more food; if he doesn't come, we won't buy any more food.)

    ·        You can phone me at the hotel if you need to contact me.

    ·        You should inform the police if your bicycle is stolen.

     

    You can use in case (+ past) to say why somebody did something:

     

    • We bought some more food in case Tom came. (= because it was possible that Tom would come)
    •  I drew a map for Sarah in case she couldn't find the house.
    • We rang the bell again in case they hadn't heard it the first time.


    Put in case or if:

     

     

     





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    1. Ann might phone this evening. I don't want to go out (in case/ if) she phones.

    2. You should tell the police (in case/ if) your bicycle is stolen.

    3. I hope you'll come to London sometime. (in case/ if) you come, you can stay with us.

    4. This letter is for Susan. Can you give it to her (in case/ if) you see her?

    5. Write your name and address on your bag (in case/ if) you lose it.

    6. Go to the lost property office (in case/ if) you lose your bag.

    7. The burglar alarm will ring (in case/ if) somebody tries to break into the house.

    8. I’ve just painted the door. I'll put a WET PAINT notice next to it (in case/ if) somebody doesn't realise it's just been painted.

    9. I was advised to arrange insurance (in case/ if) I needed medical treatment while I was abroad.









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