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    Learn English > English lessons and exercises > English test #89900: Participle Clauses
    > Other English exercises on the same topic: Present participle [Change theme]
    > Similar tests: - The particle DOWN for the verbs from P to W - Past simple or past participle - Past participle - -ING or -ED - Participle -ing or -ed - Present participle - Present perfect - Verbs + ing
    > Double-click on words you don't understand


    Participle Clauses


    PARTICIPLE CLAUSES

    A participle clause contains either a present participle, e.g. seeing,a past participle, e.g. seen,or a perfect participle, e.g. having seen.

    TIME CLAUSES

    A) to replace a time clause to show that an action took place while another was already in progress.

    Walking down the street on Saturday, I saw Simon.

    (replaces As/ When/ While I was walking)

    B) to replace a time clause to indicate that the event in the subordinate clause comes immediately before the event in the main clause.

    Raising their glasses, they wished Darren a happy birthday.

    C) to emphasize that the event in the subordinate clause happened before the event in the main clause.

    Having spent my money on a car, I couldn't afford a holiday.

    RELATIVE CLAUSES

    A) to replace a relative clause when we give more information about a person or thing.

    The woman wearing the funny yellow hat is my cousin Jane.

    (replaces who is wearing)

    The plane, last used in World War II, is now a museum exhibit.

    (replaces which was last used)

    REASON/ RESULT

    to show that the event in the main clause occurs because of the event in the subordinate clause. It can replace a reason clause.

    Not understanding Tom's question, I was unable to give him an answer.

    (replaces Because / Since I didn't understand)

    Very often the event in the main clause is the result of the event in the subordinate clause.

    Having spent my money on a car, I couldn't afford a holiday.

    CONDITION

    to replace a conditional clause

    Washed at the wrong temperature, clothes can shrink

    (If they are washed at the wrong temperature, clothes can shrink)


    NOTE The subject of the participle must also be the subject of the other verb.

    It is not possible to say Having a bath,the phone rang.






    English exercise "Participle Clauses" created by anonyme with The test builder
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    1. Travelling on the tram the other day,
    2. Not knowing where I was,
    3. Having spent so much money on a leather bag for Jane,
    4. Not recollecting who the woman was,
    5. Opening my bedroom window,
    6. Grown in the right conditions,
    7. Not having a mobile phone,
    8. Parking her car in a side road,
    9. Having finished his medical training,
    10. A group of scientists doing research on stem cells








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