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    Preposition / adverb

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    Preposition / adverb
    Message from mohammad51 posted on 02-08-2018 at 14:58:01 (D | E | F)
    Hello
    Although I am not satisfied to consider this phrase acting as an adverb, let me ask you.
    Place: put adverbs of place after the verb or object.
    " I gave my homework to my teacher"
    1- Is the phrase, which I coloured in blue, considered an adverb ?
    2- if it is not considered an adverb, what is its grammar function?

    -------------------
    Edited by lucile83 on 02-08-2018 17:55


    Re: Preposition / adverb from gerondif, posted on 02-08-2018 at 16:14:12 (D | E)
    Hello
    Put adverbs of place after the verb or object.
    " I gave my homework to my teacher"

    Ah, yes, but to my teacher is not a location complement.
    I went to my teacher's home (I went there) would be one.
    I went to Paris (I went there) would be one.
    A rather bizarre confusion indeed !!

    In French, what used to be called a complement of attribution is now called secundary object complement.
    I lent/gave/showed a picture to my teacher.
    It is used with a verb followed by a direct object when you want to indicate for whom or to whom it was intended.

    We teach the students to replace it with a pronoun, not an adverb !!
    Give this pen to your teacher.
    Give this pen to him.
    Give it to him.
    Give him this pen.
    Give him it is wrong !!
    Give him one would be correct.

    You couldn't say: Give this pen there !



    Re: Preposition / adverb from mah, posted on 02-08-2018 at 18:02:34 (D | E)
    Hello
    Gerondif , would you please tell me why ( Give him it ) is not correct? You mean we cannot use both objects in pronoun form!? Thank you in advance



    Re: Preposition / adverb from gerondif, posted on 02-08-2018 at 18:44:50 (D | E)
    Hello
    it or them cannot come after a pronoun used to replace a complement introduced by "to" originally.
    Give this cake to Jenny can become give it to her but can't become give her it.
    Give these cakes to Jenny can become give them to her but can't become give her them.
    Give this cake to my sisters can become give it to them but can't become give them it.
    Give these cakes to Jenny can become give them to them to her but can't become give them them.


    Give him one, give him two, give him three, give him some, give him a little, don't give him too much, give him a few... ok, you can give quantities after "him" but not it or them.
    Give those cakes to your brother.
    Give them to him.
    Give him them is wrong.
    Give him some is ok.
    Give him these.
    Give him those.
    Give him any.
    Give him whatever you feel like !!




    Re: Preposition / adverb from mohammad51, posted on 02-08-2018 at 19:41:18 (D | E)
    hello
    Thank you dear excellent teacher gerondif
    xxx

    -------------------
    Edited by lucile83 on 03-08-2018 08:06
    La religion n'a pas sa place sur le site, merci tous.



    Re: Preposition / adverb from gerondif, posted on 02-08-2018 at 20:03:29 (D | E)
    Hello,
    (let's then imagine I was correcting something like: May we don't stop hearing from you)
    Long may you run, Neil Young would say !
    Don't use may and don't in the same sentence, you can't use two auxiliary verbs on the same verb.
    He will go, he may go, he might go, he should go, let's go, he doesn't go, he didn't go...

    I often see this mistake: Don't let's go instead of let's not go.



    Re: Preposition / adverb from traviskidd, posted on 03-08-2018 at 03:38:15 (D | E)
    I don't think "Give him it" is strictly wrong, but unless you really want to convey this idea in as few syllables as possible, "Give it to him" is better. (Certainly a little boy will say "Gimme it!" if his big sister steals his favorite toy!)
    See you.



    Re: Preposition / adverb from mah, posted on 03-08-2018 at 10:23:30 (D | E)
    Hello
    Many many thanks gerondif.




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