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    Learn English > English lessons and exercises > English test #121570: Vocabulary: advising - ordering
    > Other English exercises on the same topics: Frequent mistakes | False friends | Suggesting [Change theme]
    > Similar tests: - Placement test beginners: Check your spelling - Past simple or present perfect - Although / in spite of / despite - Again/ back - FOR and its use - Differences between Like and As - Making suggestions - Bill, tip, fare, fine, fee
    > Double-click on words you don't understand


    Vocabulary: advising - ordering


    ADVISING? ORDERING? 

     

     

    It's difficult to teach without really "giving lessons" or lecturing! You should guide without imposing too much, correct indulgently, without criticising too much...  Yet, this vocabulary is necessary to everyone. Very often, in our daily life, we have to warn, or give a tip, recommend, and sometimes even demand... That's why it's necessary to know the differences between the following words and expressions... 

    I) ADVISING: What do you recommend? 

    Beware! The verb takes an S => to adviSe; the noun (uncountable in the singular) = adviCe => a piece of advice; your advice is good. 

     To advise          Advice+ Verb in the singular  
     To advise sb to do stg     To seek advice from sb about stg      
     To advise sb against stg   To ask sb's advice against stg
     To seek advice from sb/ about stg         Advisable
     To recommend stg to sb  To advocate stg
     To guide sb   To warn sb about stg
     A warning  To exhort to do/ urge to do 
     To take heed of sth  To give sb a tip

     To consult sb about (GB)

     To consult with sb about stg (US)

      To counsel sb
     A counsellor   In consultation of

     

    - If I were you, I would... 

    - In your place, I would... 

    - If I were in your shoes, I would...

    - I advise you to... 

    - It seems advisable to...  

    - If you want my advice... 

    - You'd be right/ wrong to ... 

    - You should/ shouldn't ... / You ought to do/ ought not to do that... 

    - Let me give you a word of advice... 

    - If you take my advice, you will.../ won't... 

    - You'd better do that... / You'd better not do that... 

    - On no account should you... 

     

                                    

     

    II) ORDERING: 

     An order                                      To order sb to do sth          
     On the orders of    To tell sb to do sth

     To have stg done 

     To get stg done 

     

    To make sb do sth

    To get sb to do stg

     To instruct sb to do

     To give sb the job of doing 

      On the instruction of 
     To command sb to do stg                            To demand that 
     To summon sb to do   A summons (+ singular)                                

     

         

     

     

      

    I had my hair cut... Err... In fact, I cut my hair...




    Giving ORDERS: 

    - That's an order!

    - You must do this without fail!

    - I'm impelled to ask you to do so...

    - Do so at once!

    1) Use the imperative forms: The imperative form is used (in the affirmative or in the negative form) to build orders... 

    - Be quiet! 

    - Take care ! 

    - Listen to me carefully! Don't listen to her!

     

    2)  A modal verb turns the order into a request and is, then, more polite:

     - Make some tea=> Could you make me some tea?

     - Shut the door! =>  Will you shut the door please?

    3) An introductory phrase softens the order and is polite too:

    - Would you mind... (+ ing) (Most indirect)

    - Would you mind opening the door for her?

    - I was hoping you could... (+ infinitive without to)
    - I was hoping you could stay a little more to help her.

    - Do you think you could... (+ infinitive without to)
    - Do you think you could do the washing up for her...

    - If you have a couple of minutes...
    - If you have a couple of minutes, I'd be glad to talk a little...

    - I'd like you to...
    - I'd like you to help me do this difficult exercise...

     

         



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    1. « Sorry, I don’t know anything about it... a professional and you’ll be fine.»



    2. « I should you about this rule... No screens allowed at all in this house! Is that clear?»



    3. «He has already taken the test and can or two to help!»



    4. They really the storm alert and decided to stay home for the whole day...



    5. «I hate vegetables, but my dad a little... He says I should taste everything...»



    6. This task a high degree of concentration and precision...



    7. ask you not to take risks when taking my car out of the garage...



    8. « money from your mother’s purse... If you do, she’ll be very angry...»



    9. «Really, Julia, simply obey without answering back...»



    10. «You know what, Tom, while you’re at GrandMa and GranDad’s, we’ll . What colour would you prefer: blue or green?»



     

     

                                                          








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