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    Simple/ compound

    Forum > English only || Bottom

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    Simple/ compound
    Message from mohammad51 posted on 08-04-2021 at 12:36:13 (D | E | F)
    Hello
    Please if any teacher could help ?
    Thank you in advance.

    Is it simple sentence or compound ?
    The old man got up and walked slowly away.

    As much as we have learned the compound sentence is composed of two independent clauses.
    The basic contents of any clause is to include S + V
    I see the sentence above is simple and ( AND ) is used to join the compound verb.
    If we divide as bellow it becomes two full sentences.

    I know
    The old man got up. The old man walked slowly a way.
    I see the only way to make compound is as follow:
    The old man got up, and he walked slowly away. ( the second clause : it has S + V )

    Anyway, it looks better on its first version.


    Re: Simple/ compound from mohammad51, posted on 09-04-2021 at 01:29:23 (D | E)
    Hello
    I see that my question hasn't been answered yet.
    xxxx

    ------------------
    Edited by lucile83 on 09-04-2021 09:01
    grey + it is useless to ask someone as a private teacher.




    Re: Simple/ compound from gerondif, posted on 09-04-2021 at 11:40:48 (D | E)
    Hello
    For me, and is coordinating two independent sentences, it doesn't matter if the second "he" is omitted.



    Re: Simple/ compound from mohammad51, posted on 10-04-2021 at 16:54:44 (D | E)
    Dear teacher gerondi
    The old man got up and walked slowly away.

    got up \ walked are compound verbs

    From one book I lastly have read : Writers Inc

    A comma may be used between two independent clauses which are joined by
    coordinating conjunctions such as these: but, or, nor, for, yet, and, so.
    My friend smokes constantly, but he still condemns industry for
    its pollution.
    Note: Do not confuse a sentence with a compound verb for a compound sentence.
    My friend smokes but still condemns industry for its pollution.
    (This is a simple sentence with a compound verb; use no comma.)
    606 Commas are used to separate individual words, phrases, or clauses in a series.
    (A series contains at least three items.)
    I used a rapalla, a silver spoon, a nightcrawler harness, and a Swedish pimple.
    The bait I used included kernels of corn, minnows, bacon rind, larvae, and spawn sacks.
    Note: Do not use commas when the words in a series are connected with or, nor,
    or and.
    I plan to catch bass or trout or sunfish.
    607 Commas are used to enclose an explanatory word or phrase inserted in a sentence.
    Spawn, or fish eggs, are tremendous bait.
    An appositive, a specific kind of explanatory word or phrase, identifies or renames
    a preceding noun or pronoun. (Do not use commas with restrictive appositives.
    See the third example below and 611.)
    My father, an expert angler, uses spawn to catch brook trout.
    The objective, to hook fish, is easier to accomplish with spawn.
    The word angleworm applies to an earthworm used for fishing.
    ---
    Again to the simple sentence :
    A simple sentence may have a simple subject or a compound subject. It may have a
    simple predicate or a compound predicate. But a simple sentence has only one independent
    clause, and it has no dependent clauses. A simple sentence may contain one or more
    phrases.
    My back aches, (simple subject; simple predicate)
    My teeth and my eyes hurt, (compound subject; simple predicate)
    My hair and my muscles are deteriorating and disappearing, (compound
    subject; compound predicate)
    I must be getting over the hill, (simple subject: /; simple predicate: must
    be getting; phrase: over the hill)
    A compound sentence consists of two independent clauses. The clauses must be joined
    by a coordinating conjunction, by punctuation, or by both.
    Energy is part of youth, but both are quickly spent.
    My middle-aged body is sore; my middle-aged face is wrinkled



    Re: Simple/ compound from gerondif, posted on 10-04-2021 at 17:21:24 (D | E)
    Hello
    My definition joins yours, the one you found in your grammar.
    A compound sentence consists of two independent clauses. The clauses must be joined by a coordinating conjunction, by punctuation, or by both.
    For me, and is coordinating two independent sentences, it doesn't matter if the second "he" is omitted.

    I wonder if you are not mixing up compound sentences and compound verbs.
    For me," The old man got up and slowly walked away" describes two actions a vertical movement followed by a horizontal one. I could have read :
    The old man got up and lit a cigarette.
    The old man got up and started talking. The two actions follow each other but I don't see them that related.

    The definition of a compound verb seems to me to be slightly different.
    Link


    Link




    Re: Simple/ compound from mohammad51, posted on 10-04-2021 at 17:49:23 (D | E)
    Hello
    Thank you very much dear teacher gerondif,

    I am still confusing because of these books and many views of their authors
    You said though ( he ) is omitted ? Perhaps I agree or don't agree
    Simply the basic elements of any clause is to have ( S + V ).
    Unless a clause ( any clause ) includes ( S + V ) it is not considered a clause.
    The compound sentence is composed of two independent clauses are joining by coordinating conjunctions or a semicolon.
    On my view, comma is needed before ( and , but ) ?
    In this way I get on a grammar.

    Here it is from another book : Google books I picked and by using ( OCR ) I printed.
    Four authors (( Fusion: Integrated Reading and Writing, Book 2, Book 2
    By Dave Kemper, Verne Meyer, John Van Rys, Patrick Sebranek ))
    Link

    Here

    Simple Sentences with Compound Predicates A simple sentence can have a compound predicate (two or more verbs).
    ► Two Verbs To create a compound predicate, join two verbs using and or or.
    One Verb: The band rocked. Two Verbs: The band rocked and danced.
    Remember that the predicate includes not just a verb but also words that modify or complete the verb.
    One Verb plus Other Words: The band played their hit single. predicate Two Verbs plus Other Words: The band played their hit single and covered other songs. compound predicate
    ► Three or More Verbs To create a compound predicate with three or more verbs, use a series. Put commas between all the verbs, and place and or or before the last verb.

    -------------------
    Edited by mohammad51 on 10-04-2021 18:14






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