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    Adjective clause/clause of result

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    Adjective clause/clause of result
    Message from mohammad51 posted on 01-04-2024 at 21:27:22 (D | E | F)
    Hello
    Please review my answer
    Thank you in advance

    Rewrite the following groups of sentences as single sentences, using somewhere the types of Clause indicated in brackets:

    The guy-ropes were very slack. The tent seemed likely to collapse. The tent had already given us a lot of trouble.
    (Adverb Clause of Result; Adjective Clause.)

    Answers :

    1. The guy-ropes were so slack that the tent which had already given us a lot of trouble, seemed likely to collapse.

    2. The guy-ropes were very slack so that the tent which had already given us a lot of trouble, seemed likely to collapse.

    3. The guy-ropes were very slack, consequently the tent which had already given us a lot of trouble, seemed likely to collapse.

    4. The tent which had already given us a lot of trouble seemed likely to collapse because the guy-ropes were very slack.

    It seems to me solution ( 4) is the best of all, but as much as I learned " because" is an adverb of cause and effect ( reason) not classified in a group of adverbs those expressing " result"
    Result clauses are introduced by conjunctions such as so, so... that, or such that.
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    Re: Adjective clause/clause of result from mohammad51, posted on 02-04-2024 at 01:40:15 (D | E)
    Hello
    Another question I want to ask

    Rewrite in a single sentence as required

    A film is being shown at the Granada. This film is a Laurel and Hardy comedy. (Adjective Clause.)

    Should it be a restrictive or a nonrestrictive relative clause?


    A film, which is being shown at the Granada, is a Laurel and Hardy comedy.

    A film which is being shown at the Granada is a Laurel and Hardy comedy.



    Re: Adjective clause/clause of result from gerold, posted on 05-04-2024 at 12:12:13 (D | E)
    Hello

    A film that is being shown at the Granada is a Laurel and Hardy comedy. It's a restrictive clause, use "that" rather than "which".

    A film, which is being shown at the Granada, is a Laurel and Hardy comedy. I wouldn't say that.

    Remember the rule : A nonrestrictive clause (usually between commas) can be removed without changing the meaning. It is not the case here. "A film is a Laurel and Hardy comedy" wouldn't make much sense. It would be different with a definite article : The film is a Laurel and Hardy comedy. You know what film is spoken of.



    Re: Adjective clause/clause of result from gerold, posted on 05-04-2024 at 12:52:19 (D | E)
    1. The guy-ropes were so slack that the tent comma which had already given us a lot of trouble, seemed likely to collapse.

    2. The guy-ropes were very slack comma so that the tent comma which had already given us a lot of trouble, seemed likely to collapse.

    3. The guy-ropes were very slack. Consequently, the tent comma which had already given us a lot of trouble, seemed likely to collapse.

    4. The tent comma which had already given us a lot of trouble comma seemed likely to collapse because the guy-ropes were very slack.

    You can also use "that" (restrictive clauses) without commas.

    It seems to me solution ( 4) is the best of all, but as much as I learned " because" is an adverb of cause and effect ( reason) not classified in a group of adverbs those expressing " result"
    Result clauses are introduced by conjunctions such as so, so... that, or such that.

    Sentence 4 is correct (perhaps not the best of all), but I think you're right, you are not supposed to use a cause and effect conjunction.




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